Monthly Archives: November 2013

APA Student Representative Council

The APA is now accepting nominations to the Student Representatives Council. If any students are interested in becoming a national leader during the 2014-2015 cycle, you are encouraged to apply. Marie Patane Curtis is our Region 2 representative. If you have any questions about this position, please do not hesitate to contact her at patane@live.unc.edu

MAPS Graphic Tee Available for Purchase!!!

Tee Flyer

Buy your new MAPS Graphic Tee Today on Etsy!! Place your order by January 31st and your order will be fulfilled in February!

MAPS Graphic Tees are $15 each*, and all profits support the Morgan Association of Planning Students!

*THE $5.00 SHIPPING CHARGE WILL BE REFUNDED IF YOU CHOOSE TO PICK UP YOUR SHIRT!

Charcoal fabric with green design.

These MAPS tees are screen-printed on Gildan® Adult Ultra Cotton® T-Shirts. 100% cotton*, 6.1 oz. preshrunk jersey body, rib-knit neck, taped neck and shoulder seams, double-needle cover-stitched neck, double-needle hemmed sleeves and bottom. Imported. S-5XL.

Available in Small, Medium, Large, and XL. Special request sizes MAY be an option, but must be made in person. Please speak with Megan Griffith.

*Please contact me if you wish to pick up your shirt at Morgan’s campus and you will be refunded the $5.00 shipping charge.

SUPERJURY

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The MSU City and Regional Planning Program’s Fall Semester 2013 Super Jury is being held on Monday, December 16th. Please attend to provide invaluable feedback to our students!

EVENING AGENDA:

4:00-4:30 | Planning and Designing the New Waterfront (Poster Session)
4:30-5:15 | Housing and Land Development: Small Area Plan
5:15-5:30 | Break
5:30-6:30 | Planning  Studio  II
6:30-7:30 | Professional Projects

RSVP *here*

FREE TRAINING! What Does a Modern Approach to Permitting & Planning System Look Like?

Wouldn’t your job be easier if you had access to data, maps and information from other agencies? Great news! New technology is making it easier to connect workflows that improve government services.

 Join us on Thursday, November 21st at 2PM ET for a FREE GovLoop Training about how to extend information gained from data and GIS analysis to other agencies and constituents.

Training: What Does a Modern Approach to Permitting & Planning System Look Like?

During the training, industry insiders and government employees will discuss:

  • A roadmap for understanding how land management systems fit into today’s work environment.
  • Case studies on how governments are making this modern approach work.
  • A checklist of things to consider when implementing GIS.

 Register Here (It’s Free)

Finding ways to make information more accessible across agencies will result in better government responses to the needs of citizens. I look forward to learning alongside you about the great strides we are taking towards shared data and maps.

What IS a Better Baltimore?

The Warnock Foundation is launching the Baltimore Social Innovation Journal. They’d like your input!

“In less than 100 words, we want you to share your idea for a better Baltimore with us. How would you solve poverty? Tackle education? Erase the scourge of drugs from our communities?”

Technically, it’s 500 characters (including spaces) or less, not 100 words. But submit your idea and you could win.

Back in September, they asked Baltimoreans what they thought about the future of their city. I started thinking, what would I say….here’s what I came up with

What’s a better Baltimore look like? A better Baltimore is sustainable and resilient, it’s lasting yet adaptable. A better Baltimore confronts social challenges, climate change, and environmental degradation and declares, “Not in our house!” A better Baltimore knows this is no easy battle. To be successful requires strong partnerships—between government and people, economy and environment, society and nature. No longer can it be one and the other; instead, we are one, together. A better Baltimore? I’ll tell you one thing: we’re already on our way. You, me, her, him…US. We know how to do this. Together, we are Baltimore.

The future of Baltimore must be sustainable, equitable, and just. To be so requires that we come out of our homes, out of isolation. We must reunite with our neighbors and our environment. We need to see the government as our united voice, and so we must therefore let our own voices be heard. More importantly, we must hear each other. At the same time, we must give voices to those who are not easily heard. From future generations, not yet present on this Earth, to the speechless flora and fauna of our great City. We must give a voice to them. We need to fight environmental degradation and be stewards of the land, stewards of our communities and of our City. A better Baltimore cannot be achieved alone; nor can it be better for only a few. The future of Baltimore must be better for all of us— today, tomorrow, and always.